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Kitten with Frostbite Being Treated with ARL's Miracle Medical Fund

posted on Thursday, February 1, 2018 in News

UPDATE 2/23/18: Remember Jack, the kitten who was found all alone in the snow suffering from frostbite? When we told you about him 3 weeks ago, he was still in the early stages of recovery, and our medical team was closely watching his frostbitten feet, ears and tail to see how they would heal. Unfortunately, his tail and all four feet were so badly damaged that our veterinarians were forced to amputate parts of them. His ears were able to heal without additional surgery. The good news is that thanks to the expertise of our vets, Jack is still able to walk and do everything else a normal kitten could!

Jack is just one pet who has been helped by the ARL's Miracle Medical Fund, but there will be countless more who will need our help this year. Please help us continue to change lives by donating.

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P.S.: Jack was made available for adoption today but didn’t even make it into his kennel before his new family spotted him and fell in love!


Jack's Paw

Jack, a 3-month-old kitten, was found all alone in the bitter cold, suffering from frostbite, a fractured tail and an upper respiratory infection. His ears were curled from the below-zero temps and toes on all four of her feet were frozen solid. He was thin, dehydrated and miserable.

Our medical team got to work right away, safely warming him so we could save as much of his paws and ears as possible. We gave him medicine to control his pain, subcutaneous fluids for dehydration and antibiotics to treat his cold.

The frostbite has already taken the tops of his ears, and our veterinarians are monitoring his feet closely. We don’t know yet how much of his toes or paw pads he will lose and how much it will affect his ability to walk. He's not out of the woods yet.

You can help Jack and the dozens of other pets receiving needed medical care at the ARL by contributing to our Miracle Medical Fund. It cost more than $300,000 to treat animals with urgent medical needs last year, and we’re expecting the need will be the same or greater this year.

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